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MATRIX: Artist's Talk by Rosalind Nashashibi

MATRIX: Artist's Talk by Rosalind Nashashibi




October 4, 2007; 22 Minutes; Video

Rosalind Nashashibi makes quiet, deliberate films that luxuriate in incidental details of the everyday. It could be said that nothing much happens in her films, but the same could be said for most days of our lives. What happens in her films is important, but even more important is the way in which she and her camera frame our view of it. As she has said, "All of these things I have filmed go through my filter on the world, and they are very stubbornly from my point of view, look at it like this, from here, collaborate with me on that. That's the position: to get the viewer to collaborate with me on a particular way of seeing things." Nashashibi shoots on 16mm, and she makes use of long takes and static camera angles, involving less an insinuation of action than a purposeful collection of images, and referencing the history of avant-garde structuralist film. Her work Eyeballing (2005), for example, frames details of the built environment that resolve as the most basic suggestion of a human face: two buzzers arrayed above an intercom speaker, or two nail holes and a knot in a worn wooden floor. The images of abstracted faces are intercut with passages observing police outside a precinct station in lower Manhattan, subtly implicating issues of voyeurism and surveillance that are at the core of any observational film and our experience of it. Although the world at large is her frequent subject, Nashashibi implicates the formal within the narrative, so her films are equally poetic and descriptive, allusive and associative. This talk was in conjunction with her exhibition Bachelor Machines Part I, part of the MATRIX Program for Contemporary Art.