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Gene(sis): Panel Discussion & Lecture Series

Lecture series: Thinking Through Genomics

Why do artists care about the human genome? Why should you? The museum's art/science panel and six-part lecture series offer audiences the chance to think critically about the implications of human genomics for anthropology, art history, history, sociology, and philosophy, as well as to hear from a leader in the field of genomics.

Panel Discussion
August 27, 2003; yyyy 15 Minutes; Video
In conjunction with
Gene(sis): Contemporary Art Explores Human Genomics

PARTICIPANTS

Roger Brent, Professor of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, UCSF, and President and Director, The Molecular Sciences Institute, Berkeley
Ignacio Chapela, Assistant Professor of Micrbial Ecology, UC Berkeley Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management
Catherine Wagner, Gene(sis) Artist
Gail Wight, Gene(sis) Artist
Meredith Tromble, Artist and Writer
MODERATOR Iain Boal, Director, Environmental Politics Colloquium, International and Area Studies, UC Berkeley, and History of Consciousness Program, UC Santa Cruz

Do artists and scientists sometimes think alike? How do they see the world . . . create a world? And, does good art require good science? Gene(sis) artists Catherine Wagner and Gail Wight, and Meredith Tromble, who teaches art and genetics, will converse with two leading scientists-Roger Brent, a biologist who is a major force in biotechnology, and Ignacio Chapela, a UC Berkeley ecologist known for his important views about the impact of genetic modification on the environment. The discussion, moderated by historian of science and culture Iain Boal, will explore the intriguing ways in which art and genetics meet, responding to work in the exhibition as well as considering previous attempts by artists to grapple with science and technology.
Panel Discussion
August 27, 2003; yyyy 15 Minutes; Audio
In conjunction with
Gene(sis): Contemporary Art Explores Human Genomics

PARTICIPANTS

Roger Brent, Professor of Biopharmaceutical Sciences, UCSF, and President and Director, The Molecular Sciences Institute, Berkeley
Ignacio Chapela, Assistant Professor of Micrbial Ecology, UC Berkeley Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management
Catherine Wagner, Gene(sis) Artist
Gail Wight, Gene(sis) Artist
Meredith Tromble, Artist and Writer
MODERATOR Iain Boal, Director, Environmental Politics Colloquium, International and Area Studies, UC Berkeley, and History of Consciousness Program, UC Santa Cruz

Do artists and scientists sometimes think alike? How do they see the world . . . create a world? And, does good art require good science? Gene(sis) artists Catherine Wagner and Gail Wight, and Meredith Tromble, who teaches art and genetics, will converse with two leading scientists-Roger Brent, a biologist who is a major force in biotechnology, and Ignacio Chapela, a UC Berkeley ecologist known for his important views about the impact of genetic modification on the environment. The discussion, moderated by historian of science and culture Iain Boal, will explore the intriguing ways in which art and genetics meet, responding to work in the exhibition as well as considering previous attempts by artists to grapple with science and technology.
Lecture: Charles Weiner
August 27, 2003; yyyy 57 Minutes; Video
In conjunction with
Gene(sis): Contemporary Art Explores Human Genomics

Lecture: Charles Weiner
GENETIC ENGINEERING: WHO DRAWS THE LINE?
Sunday, September 28, 2 - 4 p.m.


What are the ethical limits involved in manipulating genes of living things? What constitutes wise use of recent advances in genomics?

Acclaimed historian of science Charles Weiner provides thoughtful perspectives on these and other questions. He will address the hope and hype of genetic medicine; the ethical limits of human genetic engineering; the morality and politics of human cloning; and conflicts of interest between university research and industry. Weiner asks, what is the proper role of artists, journalists, and the public: spectators, cheerleaders, or informed critics and decision makers?

Professor emeritus of history of science and technology at MIT, Weiner most recently taught Biotechnology and Society as a visiting professor at UC Berkeley, where he was last year's Regents Lecturer. His writings deal with the continuing controversy over the environmental, safety, and ethical aspects of genetic engineering and biotechnology.
Lecture: Evelyn Fox Keller
August 27, 2003; yyyy 51 Minutes; Video
In conjunction with
Gene(sis): Contemporary Art Explores Human Genomics

Lecture: Evelyn Fox Keller
GENES, TEXTS, AND TROPES: A SPACE BETWEEN FICTION AND FACT
Sunday, October 12, 3 p.m.


How does language relate to and even influence science? Evelyn Fox Keller, professor of history and philosophy of science at MIT, takes a fresh and rigorous look at the role of metaphor in science, genetics in particular. Addressing the question of how we distinguish "productive" from "unproductive" uses of metaphor in scientific thought, she will demonstrate how figurative language is indispensable to scientists in making sense of what is not yet known.

A magnetic presence as well as a great mind, Fox Keller is internationally known for her important work on the elusive and crucial connections between science and language. She taught from 1988 to 1992 in the departments of rhetoric, women's studies, and history at UC Berkeley. She is the author of several notable books, including Reflections on Gender and Science (1985), The Century of the Gene (2000), and most recently, Making Sense of Life: Explaining Biological Development with Models, Metaphors, and Machines (2002).
Lecture: Troy Duster
August 27, 2003; yyyy 58 Minutes; Video
Lecture: Barbara Stafford
August 27, 2003; yyyy 9 Minutes; Video
Lecture: Paul Rabinow
August 27, 2003; yyyy 45 Minutes; Video