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Meeting 1: Monday September 23, 1997 Kick-off Meeting


The Arts: On-Site & On-Line September 23rd Kick-Off Meeting

Location: BAM/PFA conference room

Time: 5:00 - 8:00 p.m.

Topic: Kick-Off Meeting: Introductions, discussion and organization of the IU Arts: On-Site & On-Line meeting agenda, and topics for following meetings

Attendance:

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive Staff:

Stephen Gong
Richard Rinehart
Steve Seid
Dana Mitroff
Barney Desroches


Cal Performances:

Ella Baff
Rune Stromsness


K-12 Teachers (IU Participants):

Sarah Feldman (SFUSD: Gloria Davis Middle School)
Marcia Meyers (OUSD: Madison Middle School)
Deborah Gordon (OUSD: Independent Study Program)
Madelyn Pyeatt (OUSD: Oakland Tech High School)


K-12 Teachers (new members):

Wendell Brooks (BUSD: Berkeley High School Choir Dir./Visual & Perform Arts)
Miriam Stahl (BUSD: Berkeley High School Visual Arts Dept.)


Handouts:

--Kick-Off Meeting Agenda

--Sept. '97- April '98 Meeting Itinerary Agenda (see attached below)

Discussion:

Individual introductions.

In general all participants discussed the goals of the IU Arts: On-Site & On-Line Project at BAM/PFA and CAL P, and what role they will play in collaboration with the schools and teachers, and how to organize the time and topics in the following year's meetings.

Each teacher reported about the technology situation at their school:

Oakland Tech: According to Deborah Gordon and Madelyn Pyeatt, the school has a strong computer / technological infrastructure.

Madison High School: According to Marcia Meyers: The school year began with huge classes sizes, with many more students per room than anticipated. In addition, there have been some problems with the technology available for computer and Internet based projects. Marcia is looking forward to using the equipment she requested from the Interactive University to support her activities in the Arts: On-Site and On-Line Project.

Gloria Davis Middle School: According to Sarah Feldman, the technology infrastructure is pretty good at her school, but during the summer vacation a number of school owned computers were stolen. This is a setback, but she expects that they will be replaced. She is looking forward to using the computer equipment that she requested from the Interactive University in the near future for her project.

Berkeley High School: According to Wendell Brooks and Miriam Stahl: The school has a TV station (that might showcase the On-Site & On-Line project?), but the school is not wired in the classrooms for computers / Internet. Only the school library has usable computers, and of those, only five or six seem to be functioning at any one time. This causes problems for planning full-class computer activities or regular projects on the Internet.

Almost all teachers agreed that one of the biggest problems for them is the on-going computer maintenance issue. Due to the technical nature of computers, and due to the volume use they get at school, the teachers felt they really needed at least a part-time computer lab tech support person. This individual would be very helpful in solving routine problems with software and hardware and could field teacher / student questions. It was suggested that perhaps a UC Berkeley Computer Science or Educational Technology student could serve as a high school tech support and earn credit--possibly setup through the Interactive University.

Members at the Kick-Off meeting on 9/23/97 were unclear which channel to follow to request support for the IU school teachers, i.e., who to ask about the possibility of getting a UC Berkeley student to serve as technical support for the Arts: On-Site and On-Line at the high schools.

A "Teacher - biography" page may be added to the IU Arts: On-Site & On-Line web site, to present the K-12 component of the collaboration in this project.

All the participating K-12 school web sites URL (uniform resource locator) addresses need to be collected: for inventory, to explore content , technology status (and to determine the possibility of using those sites to help support IU related projects).

The On-Site & On-Line E-mail (reflector) listserv will serve as a discussion area for our project members.

All teachers attending were given a complimentary year's membership at BAM/PFA and two Admit Free passes to enter the museum (while their memberships were processed).

Teacher research project (in preparation for October's meeting):

1. Explore the on-line and guides to the BAM/PFA collection for kids and for adults.
2. Visit the BAM/PFA and become familiar with the permanent collection in the galleries and current exhibitions.
3. Choose five works of art on display at the BAM/PFA that are be most useful to their K-12 art curriculum.
4. Get on-line and send a message to the On-Site & On-Line E-mail (reflector) listserv.


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Meeting 2: Tuesday, October 21, 1997 Case Study # 1


Location: Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA) conference room

Time: 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.

Topic: Clarification of the IU Arts: On-Site & On-Line project, discussion of the on-line guides to BAM/PFA collections for kid and adults.

  • Guide to the Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive Collections for Adults http://www.bampfa.berkeley.edu/search/collectionguides.html

  • Guide to the Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive Collections for Kids http://www.bampfa.berkeley.edu/education/kidsguide/kidsplash.html


    Attendance:

    Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive Staff:

    Stephen Gong
    Richard Rinehart
    Steve Seid
    Sherry Goodman
    Barney Desroches


    Cal Performances:

    Rune Stromsness


    K-12 Teachers (IU Participants):

    Sarah Feldman (SFUSD: Gloria Davis Middle School)
    Deborah Gordon (OUSD: Independent Study Program)
    Wendell Brooks (BUSD: Berkeley High School)


    Absent Members:

    Ella Baff (Cal Performances)
    Miriam Stahl (BUSD: Berkeley High School)
    Marcia Meyers (OUSD: Madison High School)
    Madilyn Pyeatt (OUSD: Oakland Tech High School)


    Handouts:

    --Meeting Agenda

    --BAM/PFA @ University of California Electronic Access Projects


    Meeting Agenda for October 21:

    1. Meeting agenda.
    2. Research topic for teachers for this meeting:
      -- Museum visit: five works of art in the museum galleries most useful to you and your curriculum.
      --Getting on-line and exploring The Arts: On-Site and On-Line web site: How did it go? Did you find the monthly meeting information useful? Any feedback?
      --Using the E-mail Listserv. Any questions or concerns?
      --Were you able to explore the on-line guides for kids and adults to the BAM/PFA collections?
    3. Discussion of the on-line guides for kids and adults to the BAM/PFA collection.
      --The Kids Guide to the BAM/PFA collection.
      --The Adults Guide to the BAM/PFA collection.
    4. Report from the teachers: ideas, questions, feedback about the BAM/PFA collection guides.
    5. Research topic for next meeting in November:
      --Explore the CAL Performances web site.
      --Explore the Merce Cunningham web site.
      -- Art History Writing Project
    6. November 25th meeting agenda:
      --Discussion of the Art History Writing Project
      --CAL Performances and performing arts based on-site and on-line
      --Discussion of Merce Cunningham


    Discussion:

    Stephen Gong began the meeting and addressed concerns about the On-Site and On-Line project that had come up since the September meeting with teachers and staff. He and Rick Rinehart stressed that our project is a collaborative exploration into best practices of museum and performing arts on-line and technology based educational resources, especially those geared toward K-12 students and teachers--and not a "hands-on" project attempting to create and evaluate any one model, new or existing. However, if teachers want to do some hands-on component with their students under the umbrella of this project, that would be a possibility to explore. Deborah Gordon, for example, suggested having two students from her class view PFA films and then write film reviews that would be placed onto the web.

    Sarah Feldman asked if the agenda for future meetings and discussions might include web sites and institutions not currently listed. Rick thought adjustments could be made to the list and that exploring teacher chosen sites would be very beneficial.

    Research topic for teachers for this meeting:

    -- Museum visit: five works of art in the museum galleries most useful to you and your curriculum.
    The teachers attending today's meeting did not have a chance to visit BAM/PFA, so discussion of the works of art most useful to K-12 curriculum will be held at a future meeting.

    --Getting on-line and exploring The Arts: On-Site and On-Line web site: How did it go? Did you find the monthly meeting information useful? Any feedback?
    Sarah Feldman explored the On-Site and On-Line web site.

    --Using the E-mail Listserv. Any questions or concerns?
    Deborah Gordon has used the email listserv so far.

    --Were you able to explore the on-line guides for kids and adults to the BAM/PFA collections?
    Sarah Feldman explored the on-line guides for kids and adults, and her comments were very useful (see notes below).


    Discussion of the on-line guides for kids and adults to the BAM/PFA collections.
    -- The Kids Guide to the BAM/PFA collections.
    -- The Adults Guide to the BAM/PFA collections.

    Sarah Feldman found the Rosie Lee Tompkins, Masks of Venice and Urban Revisions web pages very interesting.

    Sarah mentioned an Internet / web activity she does with her middle school students. She gives each student a handout with 20 questions regarding a particular topic that they will research on the Internet. However, ahead of time she creates on the classroom web page a list of specific web sites or links that will help guide her students to the information she wants them to research. When the students are finished, they get off the computers. If the gathered information is about a famous person for example, the students use the information to "get into character" and then conduct mock interviews "Oprah" style.

    The teachers felt most kids don't have focus to stay on-task while doing activities on the web, especially using search engines to find information. Student attention spans for reading on-line text and essays are very short. It was agreed web sites with nice graphics, accessible text, audio, and interesting aspects about things such as an artist's life would be the most captivating for their students.

    Rick Rinehart noted that there is really three levels of language used on the museum's web site: Language for or the general public or adults, language for teachers and curriculum activities, and information for kids.

    Sarah Feldman and Deborah Gordon feel that BAM/PFA on-line web information for both the permanent collection AND the short-term exhibitions are valuable resources for teaching K-12. Even if web pages pertain to a "temporary exhibit" that no longer exists in the museum's galleries, these web pages are still useful for teaching. Both teachers felt they would make use of web based virtual content, even if students couldn't view the "physical" art as part of the lesson.

    Sarah, Deborah and Wendell Brooks pointed out that K-12 curriculum and lesson plan sequencing often are bound to the calendar. Topics are taught at specific times each school year. Permanent web exhibitions can help teachers since they can access information when they need it, even if it is about an exhibit that already has been taken down.

    Wendell Brooks noted that the State Frameworks for K-12 curriculum (subject matter and grade level distinctions, etc.) could be of importance when considering on-line resources and curriculum. He felt works in BAM/PFA could be applicable to content areas in specific grades. Wendell noted the Gold Rush educational projects at the Oakland Museum as an example, mentioning how that museum has developed resources from it's Gold Rush exhibit that will help support curriculum being taught in K-12.

    Note: Future monthly On-Site and On-Line meetings with teachers will last only two hours, and will run from 5:00 to 7:00 p.m., unless indicated otherwise.


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    Meeting 3: Tuesday, November 25, 1997 Case Study # 2


    Location: Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA) conference room

    Time: 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.

    Topic: On-going exploration of the best practices of arts-based web sites, with special focus on the Rural ArtsNet, an Internet based educational program of the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, and in particular the Claes Oldenberg on-line resources and related educational activities.

  • Rural ArtsNet web site at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis http://www.walkerart.org/ruralartsnet/
  • The Claes Oldenberg portion of the Rural ArtsNet site http://www.walkerart.org/artsnetmn/whatsart/oldenb.html


    Attendance:

    Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive Staff:

    Richard Rinehart
    Sherry Goodman


    Cal Performances:

    Rune Stromsness
    Hollis Ashby


    K-12 Teachers (IU Participants):

    Sarah Feldman (SFUSD: Gloria Davis Middle School)
    Deborah Gordon (OUSD: Independent Study Program)
    Marcia Meyers (OUSD: Madison High School)


    Absent Members:

    Miriam Stahl (BUSD: Berkeley High Schoo)
    Marcia Meyers (OUSD: Madison High School)
    Madilyn Pyeatt (OUSD: Oakland Tech High School)
    Wendell Brooks (BUSD: Berkeley High School)


    New and Departing Members:

    New:

    Hollis Ashby, Director of Public Relations at Cal Performances joined the Arts: On-Site & On-Line Project.
    Mark Heiser, General Manager of Cal Performances also joined the Arts: On-Site & On-Line Project.


    Departing:

    Ella Baff, in November resigned as Director of Educational Programs at Cal Performances and is no longer with the On-Site & On-Line Project.


    Handouts:

    --Meeting Agenda
    --BAM/PFA @ University of California Electronic Access Projects

    Meeting Agenda for November 25:

    1. Discussion of the Rural ArtsNet web site at the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis
    2. Discussion of the Claes Oldenberg portion of the Rural ArtsNet site


    Discussion:

    Members developed a list of essential qualities/criteria that a good educational web site should have to be considered a model of "best practices." These criteria are listed below.

    1. Quality of Interpretation
    2. Diversity of
    3. Graphic Design
    4. Applicability for Teaching
    5. Links and Related Resources
    6. Engaging and Stimulating Materials


    Discussion about the Walker Art Site:

    Sarah Feldman liked the site. She felt the site had a lot of content, good images, big enough pictures, good teacher lesson plans and a nice appendix for other sites / links.

    Sherry Goodman felt the site was imaginative, with wonderful diversity in the Oldenberg section. But, believed the issue of "Pop Art" was not effectively addressed. The kid-friendly vocabulary section was OK, but some definitions seemed limited.

    Marcia Meyers would liked to have seen more teacher submitted lesson plans on the Walker Art web site.

    Deborah Gordon liked the Walker site with its free graphic style and the good categories such as, What is Art?, Art Vocabulary, etc. But, sometimes the site seemed to have too many choices of links and content possibilities, which tended to give the site a chaotic, totally non-linear quality. Gordon thought the activities on the site were good, and that there was a multicultural presentation of works presented. She felt it was important that a site such as the Walker list participating institutions that collaborates, for a thorough

    presentation, as well as their links so educators could do further research.

    Rick Rinehart commented that the Walker Arts Site was a bit confusing to navigate since it had too many options and a distracting "Fred Flinstone-like" interface. The odd-shaped icon links almost made him think chaotically, he said, since they were placed in a jumbled way on the web site. Too many links gave viewers a kind of link phobia, he speculated. Rinehart wondered if such a web site couldn't create a more intuitive, visual navigational pathway to various parts of the site, similar to a subway train's color-coordinated directional map, or even the yellow, blue, red (and so on) striped lines used on public library floors that allow visitors to follow them to find specific book topic areas. These he called "associative guides" or linear paths, but best would be a clear hierarchical layout of information, so an individual could navigate logically to the information s/he needed. Rinehart did think one of the best ways to help people navigate sites occurs when the site provides a good menu bar at the bottom of the page that follows you at each page you may link to within the overall site. Small icons can access pop-up menus and other useful tools for navigation and research.

    Rick Rinehart posed a question. Should museums offer on-line visitors two web site paths: One for viewers planning to visit the physical museum, and one for on-line visitors who will not set foot in the actual museum. In other words, should on-line educational resources be tailored differently for "virtual-only" visits, and those planning an up-coming tour through the galleries. This question is an important one, and will take time to answer. It appears that some institutions try to make their web sites reflect the physical structure of the building, most often in the form of a guide map to the museum. This approach anticipates that a on-line visitor wants to know the physical placement of art for an upcoming visit. What if a person only wants information, and is not intending to come to the museum? These people may find these graphic-intensive web pages cumbersome to navigate, slow to download and even visually confusing. For example, Sarah Feldman pointed out her dislike of the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive's Kid's Guide to the Collection's gallery map main menu. She feels visitors unfamiliar with the museum's eccentric architecture will not understand the gallery map, and that the small icons located around the gallery map that represent various works of art, are too small to be of navigational and informative value. This kind of representation of BAM/PFA's physical space presupposes a knowledge of the building, she said. Rick Rinehart agreed that trying to represent physical space in cyberspace may not gain much for a museum.

    Rune Stromsness felt the Walker Art site had some navigational problems. Important information was often buried deep in the site. For example, links to other related Oldenberg web resources were found only after scrolling through lots of material. This meant a person doing a quick exploration of the Walker site might never know the list of links existed. If a web site is not organized and fails to clearly present its contents, visitors may leave unfulfilled, never realizing the information they wanted was in an insignificant portion of the web site.

    All teachers agreed museum web sites should try and compile a list of links to other reputable and related web sites on the Internet that help to inform about the topic at hand.


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    Meeting 4: Tuesday, January 20, 1998 Case Study # 3


    Location: Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA) Grace Cafe

    Time: 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.

    Topic: Review and discussion of six performing arts institutions and their on-line educational resources:


  • Cal Performances http://www.calperfs.berkeley.edu
  • Kravis Center for the Performing Arts http://www.kravis.org
  • Ordway Performing Arts Center http://www.ordway.org
  • Orange County Performing Arts Center http://www.ocartsnet.org
  • San Diego Opera http://www.sdopera.com
  • Wexner Center for the Arts http://www.cgrg.ohio-state.edu/Wexner/education/education.html


    Attendance:

    Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive Staff:

    Richard Rinehart
    Sherry Goodman
    Steve Seid
    Barney Desroches


    Cal Performances:

    Mark Heiser
    Hollis Ashby


    K-12 Teachers (IU Participants):

    Wendell Brooks (BUSD: Berkeley High School)
    Deborah Gordon (OUSD: Independent Study Program)


    Absent Members:

    Stephen Gong (BAM/PFA)
    Rune Stromsness (Cal Performances)
    Sarah Feldman (SFUSD: Gloria Davis Middle School)
    Miriam Stahl (BUSD: Berkeley High School)
    Marcia Meyers (OUSD: Madison High School)
    Madilyn Pyeatt (OUSD: Oakland Tech High School)


    Handouts:

    None.


    Meeting Agenda for January 20, 1998:

    Discussion of the six performing arts web sites and their on-line educational materials.

    Discussion:

    All members were unanimous in their view of the web sites reviewed for this meeting: they lacked any substantial on-line educational component and were of little or no use to the teachers or their students. None of the institutions had any on-line educational materials. Each site lacked any interactive, educational component for students, teachers or the general public. Each web site was judged the group to be primarily "commercial" in nature. They contained limited information about visitor programs and school-visit programs, but had no on-line educational materials.

    The following points were made by the group:

    Museum and performing arts web sites should clearly state the geographical location of the institution (country, state, region, city, etc.) Several organizations failed to clearly state their geographic location, such as the Kravis Center. Many in the group didn't realize it was in Florida.

    Teachers expressed a desire for web sites with substantive curriculum that a teacher could access easily as a resource. They want to take away (read and/or down-load and print out) topical materials for teaching. Teachers also want to utilize educational web sites that will stimulate students and motivate them to learn--to allow self-guided inquiry.

    Mark Heiser pointed out that the performing arts are by their very nature, an "ephemeral art" form and therefore somewhat hard to create web materials for--since the nature of dance, drama, music and other live performances are brief, and "non-permanent." A museum, in contrast, usually houses objects which are tangible and often part of a permanent collection. These objects can be viewed repeatedly, photographed, displayed, etc.

    Deborah Gordon feels that despite the fact performing arts organizations deal with "non-permanent" collections, they nevertheless can create highly informative, educational web-based materials for teachers, students and the general public. Gordon speculated that most individuals could learn basic concepts related to stage-centered art forms, (not just about the "ephemeral" aspect of performers and performances hosted at the institution.) Performing arts web sites could inform about such as topics as: the structures of plays (drama, comedy, etc.), how plays differ from film, how to "watch" performances, methods of staging, blocking, lighting , choreography, plot, and so on.

    It was suggested, that a performing arts web site could primarily be text and still images, to avoid technical problems associated with slow down-loads and crashes of video segments.

    Performing arts components could, however, be performance-specific and still be valuable. Since there often is at least a year's wait for scheduled events, time would exist to create web materials for targeted events. They could even be used concurrently with the live performance period. But after the performance ended, didactic and photographic information would still have value as a reference for educators.

    Wendell Brooks wants on-line, interactive educational multimedia activities made possible for students and teachers. For example, a theater's stage floor plan where the user could play virtually with the effects of stage lighting, set design and so on. Richard Rinehart said that technologically such activities are possible. Limitations in time, man power and funding would make such projects difficult.

    Interactivity vs. informational content: Are both equally valuable? For example, having information that is accessible, i.e. searchable in a database, such that people can find elements they need readily, can be quite useful, even if it is not "interactive" in the usual sense. The BAM/PFA Film Archive is an example of informational content, where thousands of film records can be researched. The BAM/PFA on-line guide for kids to the collections is an example of interactive material. Both seen to be equally valuable.

    Mark Heiser would like to see educational web sites where teachers could access information, create lesson plans or other resources, then if approved, the teacher's materials could be placed in an expanding archive of instructor resources on the educational web site, so all teachers could share in the growing academic and intellectual pool of information and resources.

    Even if excellent educational performing arts materials are created and launched on a web site, it still requires the K-12 teacher to find creative ways to inspire students to learn about the performing arts, Deborah Gordon stated. Many students find plays boring compared to films: there are not as many special effects nor violence and even sex to hold their attention. Students have become conditioned to television and movie themes that have fast-paced action. Most students today have very limited experience with the live performing arts. A good teacher, not necessarily a good web site, will make the difference in motivating kids to learn about the performing arts.

    Giving students an opportunity to attend a live performance may give them a profound experience as they share in the excitement of sitting in a large audience and feel the energy not only from the actors on stage, but from the fellow students and strangers in the audience, Mark Heiser said. Live experience, of course, can't be fostered in an on-line web experience.

    It was agreed, that the sites reviewed implied they had pedagogical materials somewhere in another form (perhaps text-based booklets or handouts for school students), but that none of that material had been converted to on-line forms.

    Finally, discussion centered on reasons for user access and whether providing virtual arts materials and information will affect patronage. Will web site resources supplant the need for museum visits? Goodman noted that some individuals with specific research questions might forgo a museum visit if on-line resources can answer the question. But, the number of these instances are limited, compared to the mass of people who want a first-hand experience in the museum/ performance hall with the primary object or artists.

    Rinehart mentioned that the essays and exhibit catalogs published on the web actually sell the most hard copies in the museum bookstore. It seems the public still desires to pay for the tangible rather than to have free access to the virtual.

    Hollis Ashby commented on the complex process necessary for preparing educational materials for performing arts events. Usually the information isn't created from scratch, but is drawn from a combination of materials from the artist, outside organizations and so on. Often the materials contain essays and photos that have copy right restrictions. Getting permission to use these for the educational component of the web site might pose problems.


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    Meeting 5: Tuesday, February 17th, 1998 Case Study # 4


    Location: Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA) Grace Cafe

    Time: 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.

    Topic: Review and discussion of two commercial K-12 educational resource sites:

  • Computer Curriculum http://www.edscape.com
  • Scholastic Network http://www.scholasticnetwork.com


    Attendance:

    Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive Staff:

    Richard Rinehart
    Stephen Gong
    Barney Desroches


    Cal Performances:

    Rune Stromsness


    UC Berkeley Teaching Library at Moffitt:

    Lisa Yesson


    K-12 Teachers (IU Participants):

    Wendell Brooks (BUSD: Berkeley High School)
    Deborah Gordon (OUSD: Independent Study Program)
    Marcia Meyers (OUSD: Madison Middle School)
    Madelyn Pyeatt (OUSD: Oakland Tech High School)
    Elizabeth Lay (OUSD: Oakland Tech High School)


    Absent Members:

    Sherry Goodman (BAM/PFA)
    Steve Seid (BAM/PFA)
    Mark Heiser (Cal Performances)
    Hollis Ashby (Cal Performances)
    Sarah Feldman (SFUSD: Gloria Davis Middle School)
    Miriam Stahl (BUSD: Berkeley High School)


    The Arts: On-Site & On-Line project welcomes two new members!

    Lisa Yesson
    IU Project Coordinator
    California Heritage Pilot Project
    UC Berkeley Teaching Library at Moffitt Library

    Elizabeth Lay
    Oakland Tech High School - English Department
    Oakland Unified School District


    Meeting Agenda for January 20, 1998:

    Discussion of two commercial K-12 educational web sites: Computer Curriculum and Scholastic Network.

    Handouts:

    None.


    Discussion:

    Nearly all members had trouble accessing the "members only" sections of the commercial web sites because of password and log-in problems. These problems were a result of errors on the instructions given to members. A few letters were inadvertently capitalized on the instruction sheet. This made access impossible for those who did not use all lower case letters. This problem raised a question: should password and log-in names be case sensitive? It can make access all the more difficult for individuals who over look a capital or lower case letter.

    Nevertheless, a very meaningful discussion took place at the meeting, as those who were able to access the site explained to others what they found.


    Recommendations / points made by the Arts: On-Site & On-Line members:

    Commercial K-12 educational resource web sites would do well to have an admission statement that expresses the political and educational orientation of the institution sponsoring the site. This admission statement would help educators and users understand the underlying objectives and political orientation the site may have. Some sites may have ties with industry, political parties or foreign countries which impart an "informational flavor" or perspective. Teachers may want to know this orientation up-front before they send students onto the web site to do activities.

    The management of an institution's web site must be aware of how they are dictating, presenting "their interpretation" of the content and information. For example, when a museum makes an interpretation of an artist and his/her works, what is written or told will impact audience/community members in different ways. A discussion of art that relies extensively on sophisticated language may only reach a cultural elite, while a well written, multi-layered interpretation might enlighten a wider audience spectrum--people from many walks of life--since it plays to different modes of learning (visual, conceptual, spatial, metaphorical). A commercial educational web site should keep in mind how it is presenting information, so that it can be understood and appreciated by a variety of learners who have different backgrounds and learning styles.

    Should Museums and Performing Arts web sites be used as resource "links" on commercial educational web sites? In other words, a museum may provide educational resources that the educational site lacks, but would like to include. The commercial sites we looked at did not have art or performing art components, and therefore lack a very important area of cultural education. So perhaps it is advisable for a museum to ask a commercial educational site to channel its on-line customers to the museum so they can learn about art. It could be one way the museum could increase it's audience. Perhaps there could be financial perks for a museum that establishes this kind of link with a commercial education site.


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    Meeting 6: Tuesday, March 24th, 1998 Case Study # 5


    Location: Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA) Grace Cafe

    Time: 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.

    Topics:

    Topic 1: Commercial On-line Education Services Continued discussion from February's meeting

  • Computer Curriculum http://www.edscape.com
  • Scholastic Network http://www.scholasticnetwork.com

    Topic 2: Media Literacy Projects on the Internet

  • The Media Literacy Online Project at University of Oregon http://interact.uoregon.edu/medialit/homepage
  • Workshops for Media Literacy http://www.aa.edu/media/workshops/workshops.html
  • Media Literacy http://www.health.org/medltnew/index.htm


    Attendance:

    Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive Staff:

    Stephen Gong
    Sherry Goodman
    Richard Rinehart
    Barney Desroches


    Cal Performances:

    Hollis Ashby


    K-12 Teachers (IU Participants):

    Wendell Brooks (BUSD: Berkeley High School)
    Deborah Gordon (OUSD: Independent Study Program)
    Marcia Meyers (OUSD: Madison Middle School)
    Madelyn Pyeatt (OUSD: Oakland Tech High School)
    Elizabeth Lay (OUSD: Oakland Tech High School)
    Sarah Feldman (SFUSD: Gloria Davis Middle School)


    Absent Members:

    Steve Seid (BAM/PFA)
    Mark Heiser (Cal Performances)
    Rune Stromsness (Cal Performances)
    Lisa Yesson (UC Berkeley Teaching Library at Moffitt)
    Miriam Stahl (BUSD: Berkeley High School)


    Handouts:

    The Orlando Museum of Art "Pre-Columbian Art" CD-ROM was distributed at the meeting, but there were only five copies, so members will take turns looking at the CD.

    The CD features over 200 QuickTime Virtual Reality movies of Pre-Columbian art objects. Each object can be rotated 360 degrees by the viewer, so the art pieces can be seen from all angles. In addition, there are options for voice narration in three languages. The CD was the outgrowth of a collaborative project between the Orlando Museum of Art and the Orange County Public Schools, with all interactive multimedia features having been created by high school students using HyperStudio software. This educational CD utilizing new technologies, exemplifies the positive outcome a museum-to-school collaboration can have.

    The CD will be discussed at the April, 1998 Arts: On-Site and On-Line meeting.

    Meeting Discussion:

    At the February meeting nearly all members had trouble accessing the "members only" sections of the commercial web sites because of password and log-in problems. These problems were a result of errors in the instructions given to members. A few letters were inadvertently capitalized on the instruction sheet. This made access impossible for those who did not use all lower case letters. Consequently, we looked again at the commercial sites and discussed them on March 24th.

    Recommendations / points made by the Arts: On-Site & On-Line members regarding commercial and media literacy sites:

    Teachers in our group felt that for the most part, non-commercial sites were better for their teaching needs than the commercial sites we examined. Teachers like content and lessons created by other "working teachers" on free-access web sites because it is usually designed fairly well, and there is a lot of it on the web. For example, the Getty's Arts Ed Net web site contains a vast amount of materials the teachers liked, and they questioned why they would want to pay for materials on the commercial sites.

    The Edscape commercial site had too much text in places, and in other areas seemed to have a "pop journalism" presentation, like "Teen Magazine." The site seemed to be trying to be entertaining for kids with a short attention span. In contrast, some university sites have educational materials that may be too technical or "age-inappropriate" for students (M. Meyers).

    All agreed educational materials on the web need better organization and cross-reference capability so educators can obtain comprehensive teaching materials quickly. Institutions such as the Getty and universities across the world are beginning to supply substantial quantities of free materials. Teachers felt accessing free materials from many sites caused the commercial educational information to seem limited in comparison. Having to use passwords and pay for access locks the user in the commercial site's domain, and valuable educational sites outside the commercial site are not linked, restricting the teacher's access to additional valuable information.

    A general comment: To help teachers find good, "free" educational materials on the Internet (without having to resort to commercial educational sites), a "standard of scholarship" for web sites needs to be established by a reputable institution such as the American Association of Museums or National Educational Council. This institution would evaluate educational web sites, and if deemed educationally sound, would apply a "stamp (logo) of approval" so teachers could identify worthy sites with accurate information. Teachers need "trusted authorities" to signify good educational sites.

    Teachers have not had great success allowing students do "free research" over the Internet. Internet searches are hit-and-miss and many sites have questionable subject matter or educational material that is inaccurate or untrue. For this reason, the Internet remains of limited use for student-based research activities. Teachers want lists of organized links (grouped by subject matter, historical era, state Framework curricular strand, etc.) that link to "approved" educational sites (as mentioned above).

    Although "free research" is difficult for students to do, teachers agreed they nevertheless need to learn how to discriminate worthwhile web sites from poor ones in case they must do a net search.

    For teachers bringing students to museums, there is a book that could help. How to Visit a Museum has model lesson plans teachers can use to help students get the most out of a museum field trip or visit. Museums could profit by creating "how to visit a museum" guides on the web.

    Teachers continue to have trouble gathering comprehensive teaching materials (materials that address social, historical and artistic issues) from the Internet. Usually the information they need has not been "tied together" in a thematic manner. For example, how can a teacher teach about American History in the 1850's and search for, and find, a given body of art and art historic interpretation, to "illustrate" a history lesson? Or, in the opposite direction, given a certain body of art, what historical period, literature or social issues should be addressed to put it into context?

    A good future assignment for a museum: Design and implement a well organized web site resource with a "global approach" to presenting art historical educational materials, lesson plans and K-12 teacher informational guides that tie together important social, economic, historic and artistic - musical trends for a number of periods in history (Renaissance, Industrial Revolution, Civil War, 20th century, 1950's, etc.). Furthermore, having a global approach, the resource would include art and historical information about cultures from Africa, Asia, South America, the Middle East, not just European and American societies. This resource would gather and group--or link--materials that now exist scattered across the Internet. The resource would tell which state Framework curricular strand and grade level each group of materials addressed. It could be accessed by someone looking for "art" of a given historical period. Or given a body of art, a "historical period" could be presented.

    BAM/PFA could choose best works to serve instructional / curricular multi-needs of teachers (similar to ideas above): i.e. Albert Bierstadt's "Yosemite Winter Scene" landscape painting, with grand vistas and gigantic mountain peaks jutting through the clouds, could help illustrate the historical "manifest destiny" perspective of society in the 1800' in America.

    Materials created for the web (by museums, universities and other institutions) need to adopt a standardized naming / labeling convention so teachers and educational resource sites (as mentioned above, or the existing SCORE educational site) can identify the resource material, and know its significance: what K-12 Framework and grade level it addresses, its curricular objective, how it ties with historical, economic, artistic issues, and how it can therefore be "linked" or located by teachers doing searches with Internet finding aids.

    Members agreed it is fine to have a web site resource just for teachers, without a student component. Teachers would access it for materials and lesson plans. Ideally the materials should be comprehensive and tied to one web page only--not a series of disjointed links off to other web sites which become a non-linear nightmare for a teacher to follow, and organize from. Teachers need lesson plans as a cohesive unit, not endless links. The provider of the lesson plan must limit links to off-site materials, so links that are used remain specifically tied to the topic.


    Presentation: Sarah Feldman's HyperStudio and QuickTime Virtual Reality IU Project at Gloria Davis Middle School in San Francisco

    Sarah Feldman presented a very impressive multimedia project she created that featured HyperStudio software and QuickTime Virtual Reality movies of African-like paper mache masks that her students designed. Feldman's multimedia project showcased her involvement with the Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive, the UC Berkeley Interactive University Project, and her student's artistic work--in a dynamic, new way! Her presentation will be launched on her classroom web site soon. Feldman was commended for her excellent work, and the project clearly is an example of a "best practice" use of technology for educational purposes. We look forward to including Feldman's presentation on this web site in the near future.


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    Meeting 7: Tuesday, April 21, 1998 Case Study # 6


    Location: Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA) Conference Room

    Time: 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.

    Topics:

    * The CD features over 200 QuickTime Virtual Reality movies of Pre-Columbian art objects. Each object can be rotated 360 degrees by the viewer, so the art pieces can be seen from all angles. In addition, there are options for voice narration in three languages. The CD was the outgrowth of a 1996 collaborative project between the Orlando Museum of Art and the Orange County Public Schools, with all interactive multimedia features having been created by high school students using HyperStudio software. This educational CD utilizing new technologies, exemplifies one format a museum-to-school collaboration can use for housing, distributing and presenting educational information.

    Attendance:

    Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive Staff:

    Stephen Gong
    Sherry Goodman
    Richard Rinehart
    Barney Desroches
    Karen Bennett


    Cal Performances:

    Hollis Ashby


    UC Berkeley Teaching Library at Moffitt:

    Lisa Yesson


    K-12 Teachers (IU Participants):

    Marcia Meyers (OUSD: Madison Middle School)
    Madelyn Pyeatt (OUSD: Oakland Tech High School)
    Elizabeth Lay (OUSD: Oakland Tech High School)
    Sarah Feldman (SFUSD: Gloria Davis Middle School)


    Absent Members:

    Deborah Gordon (OUSD: Independent Study Program)
    Wendell Brooks (BUSD: Berkeley High School)
    Steve Seid (BAM/PFA)


    The Arts: On-Site & On-Line project welcomes one new member!

    Karen Bennett
    Education Programs Coordinator
    Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive


    Handouts:

    None


    Meeting Discussion:

    Recommendations / points made by the Arts: On-Site & On-Line members:

    The Orlando Museum of Art "Pre-Columbian Art" CD-ROM and the Internet vs. CD-ROM and other platforms for presenting and distributing educational collaborative information:

    Members of our group were impressed that high school students, and not a professional organization, had created the Pre-Columbian CD. For student work, this was pretty good. However, there were many criticisms of the CD in general:

    First and foremost, all members agreed that the CD lacked any deeply thought-provoking, impressionable or memorable content that could be taken away by the viewer, stimulating new or on-going interest in Pre-Columbian art. The works of art in and of themselves are, of course, valuable, but how can their significance and unique qualities be shared with the viewer in a way promoting curiosity and passion? Members agreed the CD format lost an important opportunity to achieve greater success.

    It is just not enough to have voice narration that merely repeats dry, lifeless object contextual information. It is not enough to have QuickTime Virtual Reality (QTVR) available to rotate objects. Interesting "story telling," fascinating associations and mind puzzling questions and answers about the art that would engage the viewer, and make the art's importance "come alive," are missing. It would be better to have fewer objects, and tell more about each item.

    This kind of "fleshing out" of the CD project would, of course, take great effort, time and research, but would make it far more dynamic in the end, especially if fewer objects are featured. For example, short fascinating descriptions of how objects were used and why that was important, would help. How was the object found or excavated? Do anthropologists think it was used in conjunction with animal or human sacrifices? How does a serving bowl found in Columbia compare or contrast with one found in Costa Rica? Where did the people find the clay to produce the objects, and what techniques were used to create them? What kind of interconnections can be made between these objects and ones made today? If this CD was intended for K-8 students these added features could be narrated by students in those grades.

    The CD was not cross-platform, limiting its use.

    The CD lacked any content information or an overview. In the beginning, as the CD is opened, or as a menu option, there should be a description (one or two paragraphs) that explains what the CD content is, who created it, and for what audience the CD is primarily geared. The credits page is hidden, and many viewers may never get far enough into the CD to find it and learn about the project.

    The CD lacked navigational instructions, and some members of our project failed to recognize that the images were actually QTVR movies and could be rotated.

    The main menu of the CD has a map of Central American countries with country names underlined beside them. This is poor design because presenting the country name as an underlined word makes it appear to be a hypertext link. However, when clicked it did NOT link to information about the country. Multimedia should not be designed with a new interface that conflicts with current standards. The entire Internet follows that underlined words are hypertext links, so the CD should not stray from this understood convention.

    Country name banners presented in drop shadowed boxes on the top of QTVR pages appeared to be clickable, but were not, while the same style of drop shadowed boxes for QTVR object thumb nail icons were clickable, producing the QTVR image. This inconsistency is confusing for the viewer.

    The QTVR images are limited in size, and cannot be enlarged for full screen viewing.

    The Internet links on the CD were viewed positively, making the total information more comprehensive and complete.

    Recommendations / points made by the Arts: On-Site & On-Line members regarding:

    The Internet vs. CD-ROM and other platforms for presenting and distributing educational collaborative information:

    General issues of K-12 school technology infrastructure were discussed. Teachers pointed out again the very core of the technology problem: schools have no standardized level of technology, and thus varying degrees of access. "Best practices" of how to use the Internet and technology might better be labeled, "promising practices" since most schools are not yet equipped to profit by the current opportunities that computers have made available.

    For the IU Project to be more successful, K-12 school system needs to be strengthened to use the new electronic tools that now exist.

    Today demands placed on K-12 teachers to "keep up" with technology-savvy students are dramatic. The reality is that in addition to preparing lesson plans, taking care of student discipline problems and all the other factors associated with K-12 teaching, teachers are now expected to learn and use new forms of technology--which the students are already far more skilled. Most teachers must now take extra course work to learn about educational technology. These factors may affect how teachers embrace new technology-dependent projects sponsored by museums and performing arts centers.

    Furthermore, statistics indicate that today the majority of teachers are 50+ years old and termed the "retiring teacher population." Often older teachers have more difficulty adapting to the demands placed on them to use technology in teaching. The next wave of younger teachers will probably be much more prepared to engage in IU-type collaborations and hopefully by that time, schools will have more computers and equipment to make future projects more successful.

    Should museums aid the K-12 system by developing on-site computer tech labs to make computer access available student groups? Member teachers believed that museum tech labs would actually be more beneficial for teachers, than students. Bringing student groups to the museum requires field trip and transportation permission, time and other concerns when students leave the school site. However, since teachers must attend workshops and classes to upgrade their technology skills, the museum could actually become a very useful place for teachers to come for such tech lessons.


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    Meeting 8: Tuesday, May 5th, 1998 Final Meeting


    Location: Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA) Conference Room

    Time: 5:00 - 7:00 p.m.

    Topic: Review and discussion of the Arts: On-Site & On-Line Project:

    Wrap-up the Arts: On-Site and On-Line investigation
    Summarize findings
    Discuss significant points
    Draw consensus: "best / promising practices"
    Draft finalized project criteria list / recommendations


    Note: The final criteria and recommendations are the core of this project, and are intended to help:

    1. K-12 teachers when looking for educational resources on the Internet.

    2. Museums and arts organizations when creating educational electronic resources.

    3. Performing arts institutions, museums and K-12 schools that are planning collaborative educational projects that will make use of technology and the Internet.

    4. The larger community of individuals, students, professionals, and organizations wishing to make effective electronic educational materials.


    Attendance:

    Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive Staff:

    Stephen Gong
    Sherry Goodman
    Richard Rinehart
    Barney Desroches


    Cal Performances:

    Hollis Ashby
    Mark Heiser


    UC Berkeley Teaching Library at Moffitt:

    Lisa Yesson


    K-12 Teachers (IU Participants):

    Wendell Brooks (BUSD: Berkeley High School)
    Deborah Gordon (OUSD: Independent Study Program)
    Marcia Meyers (OUSD: Madison Middle School)
    Madelyn Pyeatt (OUSD: Oakland Tech High School)
    Elizabeth Lay (OUSD: Oakland Tech High School)
    Sarah Feldman (SFUSD: Gloria Davis Middle School)


    Absent Members:

    Steve Seid (BAM/PFA)
    Karen Bennett (BAM/PFA)


    Meeting Discussion:

    Final discussion to review and prioritize findings the Arts: On-Site & On-Line Project produced during the course of this pilot. Discourse on the significance of various points, final ideas, and closure of the project.

    Most discussion focused on the following list of web site / electronic educational resource evaluation criteria:

    1. Quality of Interpretation
    2. Diversity of Information
    3. Graphic Design
    4. Applicability for Teaching
    5. Links and Related Resources
    6. Engaging and Stimulating Materials
    7. Enhancing the Real Experience


    Results of this discussion, and synthesis of the overall findings from our six case studies are reflected in the CRITERIA LIST found at the beginning of this report.


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