ABOVE: Peter Paul Rubens: The Road to Calvary, c. 1632; oil, emulsion paint on wood; 23 1/2 x 18 in.; museum purchase. Visit the exhibition website, which includes excerpts from the exhibition catalog, an online exhibition, a timeline, and teacher resources.

EDUCATION PROGRAMS

FIRST IMPRESSIONS: FREE FIRST THURSDAYS

BLIND AT THE MUSEUM

NARRATING MORAL MODELS

SLATER BRADLEY/MATRIX 216

EUREKA: THE EUREKA FELLOWSHIP AWARDS 2002-2004

IRRECONCILABLE: THE 35TH UC BERKELEY MFA EXHIBITION

HAIM STEINBACH/MATRIX 217


ABOUT THIS EXHIBITION
RUBENS EXHIBITION WEBSITE
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DRAWN BY THE BRUSH: OIL SKETCHES BY PETER PAUL RUBENS

WED MAR 2 2005
Exhibition Opens


SUN MAR 6 2005, 3:00
Panel Discussion, "Picturing Pain in Rubens's Time and Our Own"
Stephan Jost, Catherine Opie, Tina Takemoto, and Marjorie Wieseman
Moderated by Beth Dungan
Museum Theater

What are the implications of representing, even re-enacting, the body in pain? A panel of artists and art historians will consider images of physical suffering in the art of Rubens and in that of contemporary artists who have explored and depicted the body in pain, especially through performance art and photography. Speakers will be searching out commonalities and distinctions between the artistic role of such imagery—its meanings, and the uses to which it has been put—in the Counter-Reformation and in our own time.

Marjorie Wieseman, curator of European painting and sculpture at the Cincinnati Art Museum and co-curator of the Rubens exhibition, will look at seventeenth-century depictions of religious martyrdom in the light of Counter-Reformation aims and attitudes. Stephan Jost, director of the Mills College Art Museum, will offer an overview of the various ways contemporary artists have been working with imagery of physical suffering, from the performances of Zhang Huan to Mel Gibson's The Passion of the Christ. Performance artist Tina Takemoto, associate professor of visual studies at California College of the Arts, will examine the traumatic impact of illness and pain on artistic collaborations in performance, especially her own. Artist Catherine Opie, associate professor of art at UCLA, will look at manifestations and meanings of physical pain in her photographic work, including her S&M series and her well-known Self-Portrait of 1994.

Beth Dungan, postdoctoral fellow at UC Berkeley's Center for Medicine, the Humanities, and Law, will introduce and moderate the program. Dungan recently co-taught an interdisciplinary course at UC Berkeley titled Imaging and Imagining Pain and Suffering.


WED MAR 16 2005, 12:00
Conversation, Alejandro Garcia-Rivera and David Steadman
The Road to Calvary by Peter Paul Rubens
Gallery 2

The Berkeley Art Museum's own Rubens—the dramatic oil sketch of The Road to Calvary, circa 1632—will be the subject of discussion between two professors with expertise in both art history and theology. Alejandro Garcia-Rivera, associate professor at the Jesuit School of Theology and the Graduate Theological Union, has published and taught courses on various aspects of theology and art. He will bring a Jesuit perspective to the religious symbolism of the painting and its Counter-Reformation context. David Steadman is an art historian who studied Rubens at UC Berkeley with Professor Emerita Svetlana Alpers. After thirty years as an art museum director, he returned to Berkeley for a degree from the Graduate Theological Union, and was recently ordained as a deacon of the Episcopal Church.


SUN APR 3 2005, 3:00
Lecture, Svetlana Alpers
Painting out of Conflict: Velázquez, Rubens, and the Dutch in Time of War
Museum Theater

The distinguished and influential art historian Svetlana Alpers will deliver a major slide-illustrated lecture that looks at the art of Rubens and his contemporaries in the context of war. She asks, "How have artists dealt with war? Has art served to encourage conflict? Should artists be blamed if they don't deal with war?" Alpers will discuss striking instances when art offered an alternative to strife.

Alpers is professor emerita at UC Berkeley, where she taught from 1962 to 1994, and a visiting scholar at New York University. The recipient of countless awards and fellowships, she is the author of, among others, The Art of Describing: Dutch Art in the Seventeenth Century and The Making of Rubens. Her latest book, Vexations of Art: Velázquez and Others, is forthcoming this year from Yale University Press.

This program is presented with support from Lucia van Meurs Matzger and the Netherlands America University League of California.


SUN MAY 1 2005, 2:00
Guided Tours
Graduate students in UC Berkeley's Department of Art History with an academic focus on the seventeenth century and on Rubens will offer regularly scheduled guided tours of the exhibition on selected Thursdays at 12:15 p.m. and 5:30 p.m., and Sundays at 2 p.m.

Sunday, May 1, 2 p.m.
Thursday, May 5, 5:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 8, 2 p.m.
Thursday, May 12, 5:30 p.m.
Sunday, May 15, 2 p.m.

Tour guides are Vanessa Lyon, Elizabeth Quarles, Sara Ryu, Jenny Sakai, and Christine Schick.


SUN MAY 1 2005, 3:00
Musical Performance, UC Chamber Chorus
“In illo tempore”: Music in the Time of Rubens from the Court of Mantua
Directed by Marika Kuzma
Gallery B

As a young master painter from Antwerp, Peter Paul Rubens spent nine years in Italy studying the great Italian painters and the Renaissance style, and painting for prominent patrons in Mantua and Rome.

Inspired by this stimulating period in Rubens's artistic life, the UC Chamber Chorus presents a program of madrigals, arias, motets, and masses by Giacches de Wert, Benedetto Pallavicino, Claudio Monteverdi, and others. The museum provides a resonant acoustic environment for this concert of voices and viols.


SAT MAY 14 2005, 1:30
Sign Language-Interpreted Tour with Patricia Lessard
Gallery 2


SUN MAY 22 2005
Exhibition Closes


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